Alzheimer's disease

Blog entry

In our daily lives, things can at times get quite complicated. It just happens that way. Time is in such short supply and just when you may think that you have it figured out, the game of life gets changed again. So many of us work long hours, and we try so hard to also apply personal and family obligations to our daily schedule. Sometimes it works and sometimes it may fall short. We try to make a difference in the life of a patient, but we cannot fall short on those patients that may be family members.More »

On February 8, 2012, Science magazine published research showing that bexarotene (Targretin®), a drug approved for use in the US by the FDA for the very specific purpose of treating cutaneous T-cell lymphoma [CTCL] that can not be treated successfully with at least one other medication, that it can reduce brain amyloidal beta protein fragments in mice breed for Alzheimer's disease, increasing social skills and the sense of smell. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120209144005.htmMore »

News Story

04/24/2014

A study of older adults at increased risk for Alzheimer's disease shows that moderate physical activity may protect brain health and stave off shrinkage of the hippocampus- the brain region responsible for memory and spatial orientation that is attacked first in Alzheimer's disease. The findings are published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.More »

03/11/2014

Researchers have discovered and validated a blood test that can predict with greater than 90 percent accuracy if a healthy person will develop mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease within three years.More »

10/17/2013

A Johns Hopkins-led analysis of data previously gathered on more than 3,000 elderly Americans strongly suggests that taking certain blood pressure medications to control blood pressure may reduce the risk of dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (AD).More »

09/09/2013

Alzheimer's disease affects more than 26 million people worldwide. It is predicted to skyrocket as boomers age -- nearly 106 million people are projected to have the disease by 2050. Fortunately, scientists are making progress towards therapies. A collaboration among several research entities, including the Salk Institute and the Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, has defined a key mechanism behind the disease's progress, giving hope that a newly modified Alzheimer's drug will be effective.More »

06/13/2013

Multiple drug classes commonly prescribed for common medical conditions are capable of influencing the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers at The Mount Sinai Medical Center. The findings are published online in the journal PLoS One.

They found that currently available medications prescribed for conditions such as hypertension, depression, and insomnia were found to either to block or to enhance the accumulation of beta-amyloid, the component of amyloid plaques.More »

03/06/2013

Researchers at the University of Michigan have found a new potential benefit of a molecule in green tea: preventing the misfolding of specific proteins in the brain.More »

02/07/2013

The number of people with Alzheimer's disease in the U.S. is expected to triple in the next 40 years, according to a new study published in the Feb. 6, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.More »

02/06/2013

Natural chemicals found in green tea and red wine may disrupt a key step of the Alzheimer's disease pathway, according to new research from the University of Leeds.More »

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